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Brinley, Daniel Putnam

SKU: AUT817

$20.00



Daniel Putnam Brinley (March 8, 1879 – July 31, 1963[1]) was an American muralist and painter. He was born in Newport, Rhode Island, the son of Edward Huntington Brinley and Rebecca Maitland Porter Brinley.[1] Brinley spent his childhood at his parents' home in Cos Cob, Connecticut, where he was known affectionately as "Put". During the 1890s, he came to the attention of local artists when he watched them at work.[2] Brinley studied at the Art Students League of New York from 1900 to 1902. While there, he studied with Bryson Burroughs, Benjamin West Clinedinst, and Henry Siddons Mowbray, and was most influenced by Kenyon Cox and John Henry Twachtman. Typed Letter Signed, 12/05/1933 7 x 9 to L Reading re: complimentary ticket. Signed in blk ink with light toning in paper and one-fold overall, fine/very fine condition.

"Daniel Putnam Brinley (March 8, 1879 - July 31, 19631) was an American muralist and painter. He was born in Newport, Rhode Island, the son of Edward Huntington Brinley and Rebecca Maitland Porter Brinley. Brinley spent his childhood at his parents' home in Cos Cob, Connecticut, where he was known affectionately as "Put". During the 1890s, he came to the attention of local artists when he watched them at work. Brinley studied at the Art Students League of New York from 1900 to 1902. While there, he studied with Bryson Burroughs, Benjamin West Clinedinst, and Henry Siddons Mowbray, and was most influenced by Kenyon Cox and John Henry Twachtman.

In 1908, the Brinleys returned to the United States, and Daniel established a studio in New York City. During this period his work was heavily influenced by the modernist movement, with flattened forms and a deeper hued palette. Brinley had his first one-man show at Madison Avenue Galleries in 1910, exhibited at Alfred Stieglitz's gallery at 291, and helped organize the 1913 Armory Show. He was also a founding member of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors and the Grand Central Art Galleries. In 1914 the Brinleys built a home, Datchet House, in New Canaan, Connecticut, and spent part of each year there for the remainder of their lives. Daniel earned considerable fame and profit for his murals during the 1930s. A biographical sketch of Brinley featured in the 22nd edition of Who's Who in America, issued in the early 1940s, identified him as Republican and of the Episcopalian faith.

At the time of Brinley's death, many obituaries noted the decorative maps that he created for Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City, Missouri. These maps, painted in 1926, continue to be a permanent exhibit in Memory Hall of the National World War I Museum, which is now part of the Memorial site. Brinley also created a mural for the Brooklyn Savings Bank, for which he was awarded the Gold Medal of Honor of the Architectural League of New York. Finally, he created the Great Terrestrial Globe that sat in the lobby of the Daily News Building in New York City."