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Bright, Jesse David

SKU: AUT808

$25.00



Jesse David Bright (December 18, 1812 – May 20, 1875) was the ninth Lieutenant Governor of Indiana and U.S. Senator from Indiana who served as President pro tempore of the Senate on three separate occasions. He was the only senator from a Northern state to be expelled for being a Confederate sympathizer. Autograph Slip Signed , n.d. 3 3/8 x 1 1/8 mounted, written in blk ink overall, fine condition.

"Jesse David Bright (December 18, 1812 - May 20, 1875) was the ninth Lieutenant Governor of Indiana and U.S. Senator from Indiana who served as President pro tempore of the Senate on three separate occasions. He was the only senator from a Northern state to be expelled for being a Confederate sympathizer. Judge Bright was also, businessman and a slaveholder.

Jesse D. Bright was born on December 18, 1812, in Norwich, New York. His family moved to Kentucky in 1819, and then Madison, Indiana, in 1820. He was admitted to the bar in 1831 and began practicing in Madison. He married Mary E. Turpin (ca. 1840) with whom he had two children. Bright held several public offices including judge of the Jefferson County probate court (elected 1834); United States marshal for the district of Indiana (1840-1841); State Senator (1841-1843); Indiana Lieutenant Governor (1843-1845); United States Senator (1845-1862).

He was expelled from the Senate in 1863 when he acknowledged Jefferson Davis as President of the Confederate States. Bright ran for his seat again, but failed to win reelection. In 1863, he moved to Kentucky where he served in the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1866. Bright was president of the Raymond City Coal Company from 1871 to 1875. He moved to Baltimore, Maryland, in 1874, and died there on May 20, 1875.

After losing his home in Indiana, Bright moved to Covington, Kentucky. He was a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives from 1867 to 1871, was a presidential elector on the Democratic ticket from Kentucky in the 1868 presidential election, and was president of the Raymond City Coal Company from 1871 to 1875."