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Burns, Kenneth Lauren 'Ken'

SKU: PH288

$15.00



Kenneth Lauren “Ken" Burns (born: July 29, 1953) is an American director and producer of documentary films, known for his style of using archival footage and photographs. American Director Photograph Signed, n.d. - 8 x 10 B/W - signed in blk bold ink pen from a field set in the sout; Photograph Documentary film maker with camera. Overall, very fine condition.

His most widely known documentaries are The Civil War (1990), Baseball (1994), Jazz (2001), The War (2007), The National Parks: America’s Best Idea (2009), Prohibition (2011), The Central Park Five (2012), and The Roosevelts (2014). 

Burns’ documentaries have been nominated for two Academy Awards and have won Emmy Awards, among other honors. 

At 22, upon graduation, he and two college friends founded Florentine Films[8] in Walpole, New Hampshire.

 He worked as a cinematographer for the BBC, Italian television, and others, and in 1977, after having completed some documentary short films, he began work on adapting David McCullough's book The Great Bridge, about the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge.

Developing a signature style of documentary filmmaking in which he "adopted the technique of cutting rapidly from one still picture to another in a fluid, linear fashion [and] then pepped up the visuals with 'first hand' narration gleaned from contemporary writings and recited by top stage and screen actors", he made the feature documentary Brooklyn Bridge (1981), which earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Documentary and ran on PBS in the United States. Following another documentary, The Shakers: Hands to Work, Hearts to God (1984), Burns was Oscar-nominated again for The Statue of Liberty (1985).

Burns went on to a long, successful career directing and producing well-received television documentaries and documentary miniseries on subjects as diverse as arts and letters (Thomas Hart Benton, 1988), mass media (Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio, 1991), sports (Baseball, 1994, updated with 10th Inning, 2010), politicians (Thomas Jefferson, 1997), music (Jazz, 2001), literature (Mark Twain, 2001), war (the 15-hour World War II documentary The War, 2007), environmentalism (The National Parks, 2009) and the 11-hour The Civil War, 1990, which All Media Guide says "many consider his 'chef d'oeuvre'").